Tag Archives: Lucas Turner

From the Field: When Water Doesn’t Flow

Close your eyes for a second. Picture in your mind where your closest water faucet is. Chances are that you are less than 15 feet from a sink, shower, or a garden hose. And, the chances are even higher that you have multiple places in your home where you can retrieve clean drinking water and have the option for it to be hot or cold. Now, imagine all of those water sources have vanished and map out in your mind where the closest stream, pond, puddle, lake or natural water source is. This is your only water source, your life source, and you have to visit this source multiple times a day to have enough water to cook, clean and bathe with. Also, when you are thirsty, there are no water bottles in the refrigerator to grab and you have to walk back to this far away source to quench that thirst. Sadly, this source does not produce crystal clear water, instead it is dirty and gives you diarrhea, typhoid or cholera; but you drink it anyway because there is not a better alternative. Open your eyes.

The water crisis is real. 

800 million people lack access to clean water in our world.

Water related illnesses kill more people than all forms of violence, including war

I have witnessed the water crisis first hand. As a Field Volunteer for charity: water, I am responsible for visiting villages in rural Northern Uganda and report on previous water boreholes charity: water has implemented. With an assignment of 70 villages, I was bound to encounter villages whose clean water sources have been broken, been stolen or have slight malfunctions. And I did. The whole purpose of my assignment was to get a pair of eyes to the villages and to gather information so we can get mechanics out in the field to fix these issues.

As I was searching for one of the charity: water sites one day, I came upon a group of people collecting water from the ground. I was 2km away from the site on my list, however I was very compelled to speak to this group of people who seemed very curious why a mazungu was in their neck of the woods. I ended up spending a good hour with the amazing people of the Adwil Village. In that hour they explained that there is a water pump 800m away from their village, however they are not allowed to use it because it is over crowded and has large wait times at all parts of the day. So, the 100+ families of their village drink from this contaminated water source.

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This hole in the ground produces water that is not suitable for anyone to drink.

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Gathering water is given the highest importance in many villages over things like education, family time or social development. Children like Patricia Okoi spend the time they should be in school fetching water 7-8 times a day. She is 12 years old and has stopped attending school because she is so accustomed to collecting water that she does not prefer school. My driver also explained that schools are very strict about their 7:30 AM start-time in the morning and if students are late, they risk being punished or beat. Many mornings the lines at a water source are outrageously long so children cannot guarantee making it to school on time.

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This scene right here is exactly why charity: water exists. No human being should be forced to resort to drinking contaminated water like this.

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This grandmother says she wishes every day that her grandchildren could have clean water and could have more time to focus on the more important things in life like education and family.

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The path to a water source is a frequently traveled path. When was the last time you had to take your bicycle to get a glass of water? This is one of the most common ways to carry water in Uganda. Little kids slowly take on more responsibility and graduate from their 10L jerry cans to 20L jerry cans that weigh over 40lbs.

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Luckily, Patricia’s brother was there to help her lift this jerry can on top of her head. Usually, this is a feat people conquer on their own.

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Carrying water on your head is the most effective and easiest way to transport water according to the people I encountered in Uganda. Women and children can balance almost anything on their heads from crates of bananas, to water, to stacks of tree limbs.

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This 11 year old girl is Akullu Sabella. She has so much potential ahead of her and having clean water would help her immensely reach that potential.

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The most beautiful thing I have learned from working with the people of Northern Uganda is that even though things are tough and resources are slim, life is still something to enjoy and appreciate. These three children from the Adwil Village may lack some of life’s most essential necessities, but they are still some of the happiest people I have ever met. Remember, life is a beautiful thing. I am confident that some day all people will have access to life’s most basic need, clean and safe water. My confidence comes from knowing that organizations like charity: water are devoting everything they have to making that a possibility for everyone.

If you want to help end the water crisis, consider starting a charity: water birthday campaign at https://www.charitywater.org/birthdays/

From the field,

Lucas

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My New Journey of Adventure and Empowerment

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As many know, I have danced around with several possibilities as to what I should do after graduation. And, as some of you may or may not know, I am receiving my degree in Social Entrepreneurship in ten days and I am sort of an unconventional business student; I have no desire to wear a tie to work, I do not want to sit in a cubicle and I do not want to work for a giant corporation. So, to make these unconventional desires a reality I spent this past year connecting with as many like-minded people as I could to expand my knowledge of the social enterprise world. From road tripping to California with my best friend visiting socially driven companies in the fall, to becoming involved with Silicon Prairie News and the Big Series in Omaha, to living and working in NYC for a month, I have tried to put myself out in the world to take advantage of the endless opportunities and to initiate as many conversations as possible.

After many months spent procrastinating school work by looking at job opportunities, tweaking my resume over and over, and making tough decisions that could potentially affect my career, I have finally accepted a job offer! I am incredibly humbled, grateful and excited to announce that as of June 15, 2013, I will be embarking on a six-month volunteer journey with…

Krochet Kids International to Lima, Peru! 

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Krochet Kids International is a non-profit organization that I became a huge advocate for after visiting their HQ in the fall. I fully believe that they best fit and align with my life values, goals and desires. Krochet Kids mission is to empower people to rise above poverty. To make this mission a reality, KKi believes that all people can grow holistically and enrich their lives if given an opportunity. They employ women in Northern Uganda and Lima, Peru who have backgrounds filled with poverty, low wages, little hope, but have the potential to do great things in the world. They make handmade crocheted hats, scarves, shirts, headbands and other fashion items that are then sold all over the world. Krochet Kids pays a living wage, provides job training and growth opportunities, facilitates mentoring and education classes, and most of all provides hope within impoverished communities.

Kohl Crecelius, co-founder of Krochet Kids, explains more about KKi and talks about using your passion to make a difference.

Krochet Kids added their Peru location about a year and a half ago so I am very excited to use my entrepreneurial skills in my Production Assistant Intern position. I will have a hand in all things business related in the operation. I will deal with quality control, shipping, inventory, product development and get a little taste of everything Krochet Kids Peru has to offer. Alongside me will be three other Production Assistant Interns and a Photojournalism Assistant intern. We will all live together in an apartment in the Chorrillos District of Lima. I will be entering Peru right as their winter is beginning, so I will experience mild temperatures and a heavy fog called garúa. Aside from working, I am excited to learn Spanish and to learn more about Peruvian culture. Lima is a fairly large city so I will experience new foods, music, styles and people. Also, I may have the opportunity to visit Machu Picchu and the Amazon Rainforest. Even though Lima is a large metropolitan city, there are a large portion of citizens who live in poverty every day. I am eager to learn and see how the different demographics interact and how Lima is addressing the needs of the impoverished. To say that I am completely stoked to live in Peru is an understatement!

This is Jacque’s story, one of the women working with KKp. This video exemplifies the positive impact Krochet Kids is having in Peru.

As I mentioned above, this is a volunteer position. Am I nervous or concerned about not getting paid? No. I trust that everything will work out the way it is supposed to. I was lucky to have had the opportunity to go to Creighton University for the past four years, where we were encouraged everyday to live out the Jesuit teachings to be men and women for and with others. Service was a large influential portion of my college career, from going on service trips to West Virginia to volunteering as a mentor at a local high school. I feel called to use my skills and attributes in a positive way to make a lasting impact on people. There is no better time to answer this calling than when I am 22 years old without any attachments. I hope to grow more than I ever thought I could and I hope to challenge myself everyday.

This was part of my acceptance letter to Krochet Kids Peru…

Our hope and vision for these coming 6 months is that they will stretch you in a unique way.  From being immersed in a new culture, to learning the behind-the-scenes of what we do, to using- and growing- your skills and gifts for a cause you believe in, we want this experience to shape you for the future.  

You will be challenged.  You will challenge others.  Your worldview will be expanded.  And our goal is that by the end of your time with us, you’ll feel more prepared to take next steps toward your career and life dreams. 

Now that’s what I am talking about! Thank you to everyone who has helped me along the way of finding my passion. I am excited to share this adventure with you! Follow this blog for all updates.

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Check out their products at www.krochetkids.org

* If you would like to donate to help me fund this journey, you can directly donate to me, or at www.krochetkids.org/donate. Write For Lucas Turner in the “write a note” section, and email nic@krochetkids.org to notify him of the donation on my behalf. All donations are tax-deductible. Do not feel obligated at all to do this. Thank you very much for your support!

Credits: Photos and Videos from krochetkids.org

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